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My Thoughts on Mackenzie Weaver is a short story written by Nathaniel J. Nelson in a traditional Creepypasta format. The story is currently available to read on Nelson's website, as well as in a dramatized format by several YouTube narrators.

Description[]

We've all known at least one of them: those people who you can't quite get a grip on, the ones who are just a little bit unsettling. But what if there was more to their offputting nature than a little social discomfort? What if they were hiding a dark secret, a deep connection to something you didn't want to know about, but may come to believe in when you see it face-to-face?[1]

Plot[]

A college graduate recalls his interactions with a strange and off-putting acquaintance in his school cafeteria and at an off-campus party. The narrator's friend often discussed conspiracy theories, "[...] usually some tall tales about Stonehenge or Elvis or that airplane disaster, nothing that quite fit with reality." One day, the friend mentioned Mackenzie Weaver, the subject of a conspiracy theory the narrator hadn't heard of. He explains that Mackenzie was an ordinary teenage girl from Wyoming who lost her mind one day and murdered several people at her school using a cutlass. The story was covered up due to Mackenzie being seventeen at the time, but the narrator's friend subscribes to the theory that Mackenzie came back to life as a vengeful revenant.

Over summer vacation, the narrator begins to research Mackenzie and finds that her boyfriend was murdered along with several others at a college in Maine: the killer wasn't found, but the murders were done with a sharp weapon. The narrator begins talking to his friend online and delving deeper into the mystery, eventually discovering that some people claim Mackenzie was pregnant when she went crazy. The narrator begins having nightmares about being murdered by Mackenzie.

Later in the summer, the narrator's friend comes to his house in Rhode Island, inviting him out for a drive in the middle of the night. The friend asks the narrator if he believes in Mackenzie, to which the narrator truthfully replies that he doesn't know. The friend says Mackenzie is here for him, all but admitting that he was one of her classmates. Stepping out of his car, he is impaled by Mackenzie's cutlass, whether on purpose or not. The narrator runs away, but not before glimpsing Mackenzie exactly as he imagined her.

A year later, the narrator travels to Mackenzie's hometown as a form of therapy. He asks the locals about her, and none seem willing to talk. A barista sends him to Elm Grove Cemetery, where he discovers Mackenzie's grave, her headstone vandalized where someone wrote out the Mackenzie verse.

References[]

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